Many girls are worried because they have two stout thighs. After reading today’s study, they may be happy. A team of Iranian and Canadian scientists published an article in the famous medical journal BMJ that they studied the health data of more than 2.52 million adults and found that every 10 cm increase in hip circumference was associated with a 10% reduction in all-cause death risk, and every 5 cm increase in thigh circumference was associated with an 18% reduction in all-cause death risk. In addition, every 10 cm increase in waist circumference was associated with an 11% increase in all-cause death risk, an increase of 0.1 in waist hip ratio was associated with a 20% increase in all-cause death risk, a 0.1 increase in waist to height ratio was associated with a 24% increase in all-cause death risk, and a 0.1 increase in waist to thigh circumference ratio was associated with a 21% increase in all-cause death risk. < / P > < p > body mass index (BMI) is one of the most familiar physical health indicators, and is also widely used in the academic community. Many teams have studied the relationship between BMI and the risk of all-cause death. In recent years, it has been questioned where the BMI of < p > is mainly reflected in the body mass index (BMI). < / P > < p > < p > “the rise of central China” abdominal fat is harmful to our health, which is a consensus. However, the fat accumulated in buttocks and thighs has unexpected health benefits. Some studies even found that the fat content in legs is too low, which is related to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death by 214%. < / P > < p > in view of this, many researchers believe that the relationship between the central obesity index (waist circumference, hip circumference, etc.) and the risk of death should be examined more comprehensively. However, there is a lack of systematic review and meta-analysis to comprehensively assess the relationship between central obesity index and all-cause mortality risk in the general population. < / P > < p > to this end, the researchers searched PubMed and Scopus databases for all data from its inception to July 2019, as long as those research papers were prospective. < / P > < p > of these studies, 30 were from Europe, 22 from the United States, 16 from Asia, 2 from Canada, 1 from Brazil and 1 from Tobago, South America. The follow-up time was 3 to 24 years. All 65 studies measured the body related index, while the other seven used self-report. < / P > < p > a total of 50 studies involving 2056428 participants were involved in waist circumference. Overall, every 10 cm (3.94 in) increase in waist circumference was associated with an 11% increase in the risk of all-cause death, and increased with the duration of follow-up. < p > < p > when viewed separately, each 10 cm increase in waist circumference was associated with an 8% and 12% increase in all-cause mortality risk for men and women, respectively. If the body mass index is controlled, the risk of all-cause death increases by 17% for every 10 cm increase in waist circumference. < / P > < p > when the female data were analyzed separately, we found that there was a J-type correlation between waist circumference and all-cause death risk: when the waist circumference was between 60-80cm, the all-cause death risk did not change, and then increased linearly. Similar results were obtained in the analysis of men: waist circumference also showed a J-shaped relationship with all-cause death risk, which was the lowest when waist circumference was 90cm, and then increased sharply linearly. The data of 1112816 participants from 30 cohort studies met the analysis criteria. Overall, for every 0.1 unit increase in WHR, the risk of all-cause death increases by 20%. The association was stronger in women than in men, and became stronger with the increase of follow-up time. < / P > < p > there were 11 studies with 760190 participants. Overall, for every 0.1 unit increase in the waist to height ratio, the risk of all-cause death increases by 24%. < / P > < p > with an increase of 0.1, the risk of all-cause death in male, female and healthy participants increased by 13%, 20% and 18%, respectively. Under the control of body mass index, for every 0.1 unit increase, the risk of all-cause death increased by 42%. In addition, both men and women showed a similar J-shaped nonlinear trend. For both men and women, the risk of all-cause death is the lowest when the ratio of waist to height is equal to 0.50, and then it will increase sharply. As for the relationship between waist circumference and thigh circumference and all-cause mortality risk, the data of 22866 participants in two cohort studies met the analysis requirements. The data showed that for every 0.1 unit increase in the ratio of waist to thigh circumference, the risk of all-cause death increased by 21%, 19% and 15% for all participants, men and women, respectively. < / P > < p > there are four research results, a total of 124911 participants have data on the relationship between body fat index and all-cause death risk. Overall, body fat index increased by 10%, and all-cause death risk of all participants increased by 17%, but the heterogeneity between men and women was high, with an increase of 27% in men and 3% in women. From this result, it seems that more fat in women has little effect on their health. < / P > < p > three cohort studies involving 25412 participants were included in the thigh circumference analysis. In the analysis of all participants, an increase of 5 cm (1.97 inches) in thigh circumference was associated with an 18% reduction in the risk of all-cause death, the researchers observed. As for hip circumference, 297598 participants from 9 cohort studies met the analysis requirements. Among all participants, an increase of 10 cm (3.94 inches) in hip circumference was associated with a 10% reduction in the risk of all-cause death, with a high heterogeneity between men and women; a 10% decrease in women and an 8% decrease in men. < / P > < p > the association becomes stronger when BMI and waist circumference are controlled: an increase of 10 cm in hip circumference is associated with a 22% reduction in the risk of all-cause death. Under the control of waist circumference and body mass index, the risk of all-cause death decreased linearly with the increase of hip circumference. When the hip circumference increased to 100 cm, there was no further benefit and entered the plateau period. If BMI and waist circumference were not controlled, hip circumference and all-cause mortality risk showed a U-shaped correlation, and the lowest risk was at 103cm. The results showed that waist circumference, waist hip ratio, waist to height ratio, waist to thigh circumference ratio and other abdominal fat indexes were significantly positively correlated with all-cause mortality risk. Even after taking into account body mass index, these associations remained significant, suggesting that abdominal fat deposition was not associated with overall obesity, but was associated with a higher risk. Global Tech

By ibmwl